Seminarweek

The yearly Adaptive Systems Lab Seminar Week introduces students to concepts of adaptive systems and their potential in sustainable design of building components.

 

Soft Robotics for Architects*

The 2013 Fall Seminar Week Soft Robotics for Architects* will introduce architecture students to Soft Robotics, a relatively new, but quickly growing sub-field of robotics that deals with soft materials. Through a hands on approach students will learn techniques involved in the production of soft, pneumatic, silicone elastomer based actuators. This process involves modeling, printing, casting, assembling and controlling soft actuators. The goal of the workshop is to expose students to the field of Soft Robotics as a source of possible architectural applications.

The workshop will introduce:
> Basic 3D modeling in Rhino for mold design
> Basic 3D printing on the MakerBot platform for mold fabrication
> Casting/assembly of soft silicone actuators
> Basic programming in Arduino for pneumatic control

Image: Illuminated, multi-gate soft robot developed in the Whitesides Group (Harvard).**

 

The workshop will be led in English.

It will take place in Zurich at the ETH Honggerberg campus (HPZ Building G Floor), October 21-25, 2013.

Space is limited to 10 participants.

The only prerequisite for this workshop is a strong interest in making.

 

* The title of this workshop is a reference to the paper "Soft Robotics for Chemists", F. Ilevski, A.D. Mazzeo, R.F. Shepherd, X. Chen, and G.M. Whitesides, Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 2011, 50, 1890-1895. The techniques used in the workshop are largely based on the work carried out on soft robotics by theWhitesides Group

 

**Videos of this type of soft robot in motion can be found at Shepherd Laboratory

 

General information on Seminar Weeks can be found here.

 

contact:
Dino Rossi  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Architecture & Sustainable Building Technologies

 

 

Adaptive Solar Envelope Workshop

The 2012 Spring Seminar Week (Adaptive Solar Envelope Workshop) was conceived as an introduction to the design of adaptive architectural systems through the use of visual scripting. Students were introduced to Rhino/Grasshopper through a series of short tutorials, and over the course of the 5 day workshop developed adaptive architectural facade systems. Their adaptive facade concepts were represented through renderings and animations.

Working in teams of two, students devloped scripts in Grasshopper. The scripts controlled the movement of the facade components. Movement was based on changing solar angles which were generated using Geco/Ecotect. In addition to solar tracking behavior, students explored various tiling, structural and kinetic aspects of their systems, as well as user experience in a building with such a facade. Through this workshop, students with no previous knowledge of Rhino/Grasshopper became fluent in these tools to a level where they could explore various aspect of adaptive architecture systems. Representations of students’ work can be found at the link below.

Image: Interior view of adaptive solar facade project by Martin Wey and Thorben Westerhuys

 

contact:
Dino Rossi This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Architecture & Sustainable Building Technologies

 

 

Adaptive Solar Design Workshop

The 2011 Spring Seminar Week (Adaptive Solar Design Workshop) was conceived as an introduction to the design of adaptive architectural systems through physical computing. Students were introduced to Arduino through a series of short tutorials, and over the course of the 5 day workshop developed adaptive solar facade components. Their adaptive solar facade components were physically prototyped, and renderings and animations were used to represent the components proliferated into facade systems.

Working in teams of two, students devloped solar tracking components through the use of the Arduino prototyping platform. The components were programed to interpret multiple sensor readings in ordert o orient themselves toward the direction of highest light intensity. In addition to solar tracking behavior, students explored various tiling, structural and kinetic aspects of their systems, as well as user experience in a building with such a facade. Through this workshop, students with no previous knowledge of physical computing became fluent in Arduino to a level where they could explore various aspect of adaptive architecture systems. Representations of students’ work can be found at the link below.

Image: Prototype of adaptive solar facade component by Eva Luginbühl and Fabian Reimer

 

contact:
Dino Rossi This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Architecture & Sustainable Building Technologies